Featured Interview


My guest is Chrystal from L.A.. She is just one of many positive diabetics making a huge difference in the diabetes community. She is a chemist, and diabetic activist. After Chrystal's diagnosis of type 2 diabetes in November 2007, she created SexyDiabetic.com; and donates a good portion of her time connecting and sharing experiences, both inside and outside the online diabetic communities.


Chrystal has shared with us her personal experiences living with diabetes; her role in the diabetic community; some of her current diabetic project she's working on during black history month.


We talked about some of the struggles we we face, getting the African American communities and all other people of color educated on the dangers of diabetes; as well as the fears and discrimination that still exist for diabetics today.


Click here to listen with your default media player

Richard A. Vaugn


For 2012 I thought it would be wonderful to start the year off with a positive interview!


My guest is Richard A Vaughn. He has written an awesome book called "Beating The Odds - 64 years of Diabetes Health". In this book, he takes us on a journey through his diabetic life.


From the moment he was diagnosed with type 1 at the age of 6, all the way up through completing his masters degree, @ a time when people thought diabetics shouldn't go to college (because diabetes was considered a disability then).


Richard also talks about his wonderful family and grand children, in addition to participating in the Joslin Medalist Study, funded by the JDRF & National Institute of health..


Richard is definitely an inspiration to us all. He has showed us insulin dependent people, how to live healthy emotionally & physically by example, with either no, or the least amount of complications possible; coming from a time when life expectancy for a diabetic was no later than 40 years old.


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Click here to listen with your default audio player!


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You can purchase Richard's book by clicking on the graphic of his book below.




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Diabetic PlayList

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What's in your headphones? We all know how important exercise is to any diabetic, however, the music you exercise to is also just as important too! Music can make the difference between a 3 minute workout, and a 30 minute workout. Personally, I am an oldies guy, and my musical tastes are pretty eclectic and diverse. The above playlist consist of music I am listening to on my Anddroid when I exercise or power-walk. As my mood changes, so shall the playlist.
TuDiabetes
Diabetic Connect
I'm a member of Diabetic Connect
Dear Janis
I'm a member of Dear Janis
Diabetes Stats



Socks4Life is working hard to inform their customers about diabetes.
Click here to read article


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Here is sobering news. The World Health Organization says more than one billion adults are fat, and at least 400 million people are obese. As old fashioned as it sounds, doctors say the best way to lose weight is to eat less and exercise more. But for women who are middle aged or older, experts say one hour of daily exercise per day is necessary just to maintain weight. The heavier a woman is, the harder she will have to work – at cutting calories.

Life’s just not fair. Biologically speaking, women carry more body fat than men. They require fewer calories than men. For most men and women, fitting in an hour of moderately intense exercise in an already hectic day is difficult, if not impossible. But for many women, most hours are already filled with a full-time job and raising a family. At the end of the day, at least in the U.S., there is little incentive to prepare a real dinner when fast food is so available – and so much more fattening. But some women working out at a Boston gym say they would be willing to wedge that hourly workout into their day. “I would be willing to do it if it was going to maintain my weight and keep my health,” Jane Davern said. “All right, I would do it,” Jean Holmes states. “I would exercise to maintain my body weight, yes.”

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control says the percentage of overweight Americans increased 60 percent between 1991 and 2000. The World Health Organization says more than one billion adults in other nations are in the same shape. While there is advice aplenty on how to lose pounds or kilograms, a new study focuses on middle aged and older women who maintain normal body weight, or BMI (Body Mass Index) and do not diet. “We found that physical activity was effective in controlling weight only among women who started off with a normal BMI,” I-Min Lee states. She and colleagues at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston studied data from 34,000 women, whose average age was 54.

During a 13-year period, the women were separated into three groups. The first group exercised daily for 60 minutes. The second exercised 30 minutes a day, and the third group worked out less than half an hour daily. “These two lesser activity groups of women were significantly more likely to gain weight,” she said. “Compared to the most active group of women.” During the study, the average weight of the participants went up by six pounds, or 2.7 kilograms.

So, what can overweight women do? Surprisingly, I-Min Lee and her colleagues found more exercise did not help. “Once a woman became overweight or obese, there was no relation between physical activity and weight change among these women,” Lee said. But I-Min Lee says heavier women should keep on exercising. “While our study shows that this might not be sufficient to maintain normal weight, it clearly is sufficient to reduce the risk of developing many chronic diseases, including heart disease, certain types of cancer, type two diabetes,” Lee explained. The researchers say while exercise helps prevent disease, the only way that heavier women can lose weight is to simply cut calories. The study was published in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

© 2010 VOA

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